Worcester tops national car ownership figures

Worcester News: Worcester tops national car ownership figures Worcester tops national car ownership figures

WORCESTER has topped a national poll for the amount of cars per household.

A survey by Royal Mail placed the WR7 postcode area – encompassing the mostly rural area east of Worcester from St Peter’s to Inkberrow – found each household had on average 1.95 cars, more than anywhere else in the country.

The WR6 area, west of the city north of Malvern and south of Stourport, was only marginally lower at 1.93 per household.

Chairman of Push Bike! – a group of cycling enthusiasts from Worcester working to promote the benefits of the activity – Lyndon Bracewell said the city already suffers from major traffic and parking problems.

“This congestion is set to increase due to the planned population growth and inevitable increase of cars on the city’s roads,” he said.

“Yet typically 69 per cent of all car journeys are less than five miles and 23 per cent are under one mile.”

He said Push Bike! was working to encourage the city and county council to make it safer and easier for cyclists in Worcester.

“I’m sure we’ve all noticed how traffic decreases at rush hour peaks during the school holidays,” he said. “I don’t know the exact figures for Worcester but nationally this decrease is about 10 per cent.

“The same reduction could be achieved every day if, on average, commuters chose to use a bike rather than their car to get to work for one day every two weeks.”

Green Party member of Worcestershire County Council, Matthew Jenkins, said he believed so many people in the area owned cars as a result of a lack of public transport links.

“It is a fairly rural community so the figures for car use are going to be fairly high,” he said.

The survey found the WR7 area has the second greatest amount of people married or in civil partnerships at 64.75 per cent, second to Poole at 65 per cent and just ahead of the Isles of Scilly, County Durham and Northumberland.

The information was gathered from a range of sources including the 2011 census as well as data from the Office of National Statistics and the Department for Communities and Local Government’s Indices of Multiple Deprivation

Comments (9)

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10:49am Wed 23 Apr 14

chrism says...

Decent cycling infrastructure might go a long way to help, but having seen what has been put in place for the Olympic Park area where they had a clean slate, plenty of space and plenty of money I'm not holding my breath for that happening in this country any time soon. As often seems to be the case, MR Jenkins completely misses the point by talking about public transport - that is never going to be a solution in a rural area where there simply isn't the demand to keep services running - properly supported cycling just might be.
Decent cycling infrastructure might go a long way to help, but having seen what has been put in place for the Olympic Park area where they had a clean slate, plenty of space and plenty of money I'm not holding my breath for that happening in this country any time soon. As often seems to be the case, MR Jenkins completely misses the point by talking about public transport - that is never going to be a solution in a rural area where there simply isn't the demand to keep services running - properly supported cycling just might be. chrism
  • Score: -1

11:22am Wed 23 Apr 14

Matthew Jenkins says...

chrism wrote:
Decent cycling infrastructure might go a long way to help, but having seen what has been put in place for the Olympic Park area where they had a clean slate, plenty of space and plenty of money I'm not holding my breath for that happening in this country any time soon. As often seems to be the case, MR Jenkins completely misses the point by talking about public transport - that is never going to be a solution in a rural area where there simply isn't the demand to keep services running - properly supported cycling just might be.
I did mention better cycling infrastructure to Ian Craig, but he didn't include that part. Public transport is essential in rural areas, particularly for the elderly who are unlikely to be able to cycle. It is not a choice between better cycling and better public transport - both are required.
Prof. David Banister from Oxford University gave the Mayor's Lecture to Worcester Civic Society last week all about the future of transport: see http://www.tsu.ox.ac
.uk/ for more info.
[quote][p][bold]chrism[/bold] wrote: Decent cycling infrastructure might go a long way to help, but having seen what has been put in place for the Olympic Park area where they had a clean slate, plenty of space and plenty of money I'm not holding my breath for that happening in this country any time soon. As often seems to be the case, MR Jenkins completely misses the point by talking about public transport - that is never going to be a solution in a rural area where there simply isn't the demand to keep services running - properly supported cycling just might be.[/p][/quote]I did mention better cycling infrastructure to Ian Craig, but he didn't include that part. Public transport is essential in rural areas, particularly for the elderly who are unlikely to be able to cycle. It is not a choice between better cycling and better public transport - both are required. Prof. David Banister from Oxford University gave the Mayor's Lecture to Worcester Civic Society last week all about the future of transport: see http://www.tsu.ox.ac .uk/ for more info. Matthew Jenkins
  • Score: 1

11:44am Wed 23 Apr 14

PaulMeUnder says...

1.95% extra cars? What does 0.95% of a car look like?
1.95% extra cars? What does 0.95% of a car look like? PaulMeUnder
  • Score: -8

12:14pm Wed 23 Apr 14

mack18 says...

That`ll be mine then PaulMeUnder :0(
That`ll be mine then PaulMeUnder :0( mack18
  • Score: -1

3:02pm Wed 23 Apr 14

MJI says...

Average 2 cars per household, in the countryside.

Not bad really, but then how many are hobby cars, classics only used when sunny?

How many belong to large families?
Average 2 cars per household, in the countryside. Not bad really, but then how many are hobby cars, classics only used when sunny? How many belong to large families? MJI
  • Score: -1

5:41pm Wed 23 Apr 14

Guy66 says...

Another round of meaningless statistics massaged to suit a particular need but with absolutely no credibility!
Another round of meaningless statistics massaged to suit a particular need but with absolutely no credibility! Guy66
  • Score: 1

11:53pm Wed 23 Apr 14

chrism says...

Thanks for the reply Matthew and pleased to see you getting involved - I'm happy to accept it's a journalism failure rather than something you didn't raise - I mentioned it mainly as I was surprised at the omission.

I agree that in an ideal world both are required, but realistically I'm still unconvinced how much better public transport can get in our rural areas given the level of demand (though the current provision could certainly be improved) . I'm sure some might say getting more people cycling is also unrealistic, but they have proved it can be done in the Netherlands. Not only that, but even retired people cycle in significant numbers for everyday transport there (the genuinely elderly and unable to cycle don't actually make a significant contribution to numbers of journeys and congestion).

Though the difficulty we face is highlighted by the way that motorists downvote any suggestion for increased cycling provision like mine above, despite the fact they are the ones suffering in congestion which might be alleviated by such measures. I'd wager that if the amount to be spent on improving the Southern Link was instead spent on cycling infrastructure that would have a far greater impact on congestion.
Thanks for the reply Matthew and pleased to see you getting involved - I'm happy to accept it's a journalism failure rather than something you didn't raise - I mentioned it mainly as I was surprised at the omission. I agree that in an ideal world both are required, but realistically I'm still unconvinced how much better public transport can get in our rural areas given the level of demand (though the current provision could certainly be improved) . I'm sure some might say getting more people cycling is also unrealistic, but they have proved it can be done in the Netherlands. Not only that, but even retired people cycle in significant numbers for everyday transport there (the genuinely elderly and unable to cycle don't actually make a significant contribution to numbers of journeys and congestion). Though the difficulty we face is highlighted by the way that motorists downvote any suggestion for increased cycling provision like mine above, despite the fact they are the ones suffering in congestion which might be alleviated by such measures. I'd wager that if the amount to be spent on improving the Southern Link was instead spent on cycling infrastructure that would have a far greater impact on congestion. chrism
  • Score: 0

6:43am Thu 24 Apr 14

IanMurray says...

Statistics, statistics.... Why do people have so many cars, could it be that they have 2 people in the household that work? These areas are both very rural where work is very likely to be over 10 miles away, shops and schools a similar distance and public transport, non existent, infrequent or miles away. Most of us actually have no choice. When are rural councils going to stop wasting our money pushing non-car transport options when these options don't realistically exist.
Statistics, statistics.... Why do people have so many cars, could it be that they have 2 people in the household that work? These areas are both very rural where work is very likely to be over 10 miles away, shops and schools a similar distance and public transport, non existent, infrequent or miles away. Most of us actually have no choice. When are rural councils going to stop wasting our money pushing non-car transport options when these options don't realistically exist. IanMurray
  • Score: 2

2:31pm Fri 25 Apr 14

dulon says...

These figures are a confirmation of the failure of the councils and their policies . No amount of spin can camouflage the failings in this area by the current incumbents and their predecessors .
There is no solution to this embarrassment without the introduction of a policy that is a viable alternative ..... cue the consultants and quangoes cue the opinion polls ....Enter stage right a solution that bares no resemblance to what's needed and is dreamt up by someone on the cheap .
Same old council and no blame can be apportioned !
These figures are a confirmation of the failure of the councils and their policies . No amount of spin can camouflage the failings in this area by the current incumbents and their predecessors . There is no solution to this embarrassment without the introduction of a policy that is a viable alternative ..... cue the consultants and quangoes cue the opinion polls ....Enter stage right a solution that bares no resemblance to what's needed and is dreamt up by someone on the cheap . Same old council and no blame can be apportioned ! dulon
  • Score: -1

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