Old Barbourne art school secures green light to become £6m retirement complex

Worcester News: CONVERSION: McCarthy and Stone secures permission to convert the college of art and design into a £6m retirement complex CONVERSION: McCarthy and Stone secures permission to convert the college of art and design into a £6m retirement complex

ONE of Worcester's best known buildings is being turned into a £6 million retirement complex.

Worcester College of Technology's School of Art & Design in Barbourne is being revamped into 60 apartments for older people.

The overhaul has been unanimously agreed by Worcester City Council's planning committee, which said it would help meet some of the growing housing need for pensioners.

It is being led by developers McCarthy and Stone, and has come about because the art school, in Barbourne Road, is moving to the old Russell and Dorrell building later this year.

It was given the green light despite concerns from a school headteacher, would said it would cause him "immense problems".

Ian Taylor, headteacher of the Riverside School, which caters for children aged seven to 16 with behavioural and emotional difficulties, had an agreement with the college to use a building at the rear of the site for PE classes.

Under the plans it will be demolished to make way for 46 car parking spaces.

It was nodded through after committee members said the development would benefit Worcester as a whole.

Councillor Andy Roberts said: "The Riverside School is for children with emotional problems - it is more difficult for them to handle change compared to traditional schools, we need to bear that in mind."

But Councillor Roger Berry said: "This is obviously a very significant site for Worcester.

"I welcome this development and think it's particularly important for Barbourne."

Alan Coleman, senior planning officer, said: "In our view it's an acceptable scheme - we have noted the school's difficulties but that was based on an informal arrangement, there is no requirement to carry it on."

Councillor Gareth Jones did submit a comment for the committee saying he was "sad" about the developers wanting to change the use of the building, but there were also several written comments from nearby residents who were supportive of it.

One said it was a "fabulous" solution.

The developers will convert the building into 25 one-bed and 35 two-bed apartments, which will be designed as ''later living' ones for the over 60s.

It will include an on-site laundry, a lounge for them to mix and buggy storage for visitors.

Comments (5)

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5:51pm Thu 26 Jun 14

grumpy woman says...

Why do planners think the over 60s want to live in a place like this? They want a little bungalow with a bit of garden not a sterile complex where nobody uses the shared sitting area and doors are firmly closed. 60 is the new 40.
Why do planners think the over 60s want to live in a place like this? They want a little bungalow with a bit of garden not a sterile complex where nobody uses the shared sitting area and doors are firmly closed. 60 is the new 40. grumpy woman
  • Score: 0

8:59pm Thu 26 Jun 14

truth must out says...

How many more retirement complexes do we need in Barbourne....St.Geor
ges Lane, Eastbank, Sharman Close. Seems like the 'Silver Brigade' are taking over!!
How many more retirement complexes do we need in Barbourne....St.Geor ges Lane, Eastbank, Sharman Close. Seems like the 'Silver Brigade' are taking over!! truth must out
  • Score: 3

9:38pm Thu 26 Jun 14

New Kid on the Block says...

The bit about "Buggy Storage for Visitors" tells us what type of people are expected to be housed here.
I use the word housed instead of live deliberately. I am approaching 60 myself but would hate to be consigned to such a place. Grumpy Woman is right, real people want real houses with a bit of garden.
The bit about "Buggy Storage for Visitors" tells us what type of people are expected to be housed here. I use the word housed instead of live deliberately. I am approaching 60 myself but would hate to be consigned to such a place. Grumpy Woman is right, real people want real houses with a bit of garden. New Kid on the Block
  • Score: 1

9:39pm Thu 26 Jun 14

Grumbleweed Connection says...

If memory serves me correctly, this was the Worcester Girls' Grammar School in the 60s. I wonder if any of the prospective residents went to school there?
If memory serves me correctly, this was the Worcester Girls' Grammar School in the 60s. I wonder if any of the prospective residents went to school there? Grumbleweed Connection
  • Score: 0

6:02pm Fri 27 Jun 14

Jabbadad says...

Come the day Truth-must-out.
Where there is a critical shortage in housing for older people, who unlike this generation of welfare scroungers, have worked 40+ hour weeks for many years, and without all the now demanded luxeries, is One Bed Social Housing. Which would help Iain Duncan Smith with his welfare reform Bill / Demands. But sucessive governments have failed to encourage enough social housing, since they thought that building private housing would continue at explosive rates and fill the demands, plus with Maggies Ritgh-To-Buy, (which my working mum took advantage of with we kids helping). The funds from Right-To-Buy were never put back into building more social housing, by either governments.
As to the expansion of retirement Villages / Homes, and yes while they are really lovely, however because of the costs are mainly for those who have a house to sell in order to afford the prices involved. Few if any are available from local authorites. Many start at £600 per week, some you can buy into, but still face quite high service charges.
Looking around, the MaCarthy & Stone properties are priced among the more expensive.
No matter which Retirement Home / Village you choose, when nursing care is required, charges will dramatically rise, to high £900 and even more per week. And those on assisted places may well have to move as would anyone whose capital / savings have run out.
So lovely YES
Expensive YES.
Answer to the estimated 5 millions on the Housing Waiting List NO.
Still Open Door Imigrant policies = More Housing required, YES.
Rubbish Out-Of-Touch-Politic
ians, YES.
Come the day Truth-must-out. Where there is a critical shortage in housing for older people, who unlike this generation of welfare scroungers, have worked 40+ hour weeks for many years, and without all the now demanded luxeries, is One Bed Social Housing. Which would help Iain Duncan Smith with his welfare reform Bill / Demands. But sucessive governments have failed to encourage enough social housing, since they thought that building private housing would continue at explosive rates and fill the demands, plus with Maggies Ritgh-To-Buy, (which my working mum took advantage of with we kids helping). The funds from Right-To-Buy were never put back into building more social housing, by either governments. As to the expansion of retirement Villages / Homes, and yes while they are really lovely, however because of the costs are mainly for those who have a house to sell in order to afford the prices involved. Few if any are available from local authorites. Many start at £600 per week, some you can buy into, but still face quite high service charges. Looking around, the MaCarthy & Stone properties are priced among the more expensive. No matter which Retirement Home / Village you choose, when nursing care is required, charges will dramatically rise, to high £900 and even more per week. And those on assisted places may well have to move as would anyone whose capital / savings have run out. So lovely YES Expensive YES. Answer to the estimated 5 millions on the Housing Waiting List NO. Still Open Door Imigrant policies = More Housing required, YES. Rubbish Out-Of-Touch-Politic ians, YES. Jabbadad
  • Score: 0

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