Gardens in Worcester go bananas

Gardens in Worcester go bananas

John Anyon 20/8/14 3414681001 Roy and Christina Robinson in the garden of their home at Nightingale Avenue, Worcester, under one of their many Banana Plants that have thrived this year (9519712)

John Anyon 20/8/14 3414681001 Roy Robinson in the garden of his home at Nightingale Avenue, Worcester, under one of their many Banana Plants that have thrived this year (9519714)

First published in News by

WORCESTER is fast becoming a banana republic.

Earlier this month the Worcester News reported the recent warm weather coupled with almost tropical downpours had led to a cluster of banana trees in a garden in the city growing more than 12 feet, more than twice their normal height.

Following the article Roy Robinson of Nightingale Avenue contacted the paper to say he and his wife Tina had experienced the same thing at their home.

Mr Robinson said there were up to 30 banana trees in the front and back garden of their Warndon Villages home, many of which had grown above 12 feet.

"It's been a great summer," he said.

"Our front garden looks like a plantation and the back garden has some as well.

"It's like a jungle effect.

"One of them has flowered but they haven't produced any fruit and once they've flowered they die off.

"I'm going to move some of them from the front to the back though as my wife isn't that keen on them.

Although the 73-year-old is very proud of his plants, he said he was thinking of cutting back a little and said any Worcester News readers who would like to take any off his hands to drop him a line on Yornosnibor@gmail.com.

Banana plants are best planted somewhere they will get a lot of sunlight and with decent drainage and lots of space to grow.

Mr Robinson - who described himself as "a bit of an enthusiast about tropical plants" - said he had first become interested in growing unusual flora about 15 years ago.

"It's just from going abroad and seeing all the lovely plants," he said.

"I saw some seeds for sale and picked a few up."

Although he said the trees would probably reach their highest level some time next month, Mr Robinson said it was important to keep them fully protected over the winter.

"I cut off all the leaves and buy roof insulation and wrap it around the trunk, which protects the tree for the winter," he said.

"If you don't wrap them up they rot all the way down through the whole trunk."

The unusual growth has been put down to a mixture of generally warm temperatures coupled with extremely heavy rainfall.

- Has the weather had an unusual impact in your garden? Drop the Worcester News a line on 01905 742244 or email news@worcesternews.co.uk.

Comments (1)

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2:54pm Thu 21 Aug 14

catterbutts says...

Bananas don't grow on trees!
They are a herbaceous plant - once they have flowered and fruited, the stalk is cut down to ground level.
Bananas don't grow on trees! They are a herbaceous plant - once they have flowered and fruited, the stalk is cut down to ground level. catterbutts
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