Lest we forget - Worcestershire honours its heroes

SILENCE fell across Worcestershire as people paid their respects to the country’s fallen servicemen and women.

Remembrance Sunday services took place in every corner of the county including Worcester, Malvern, Pershore, Evesham and Droitwich.

In Worcester a huge crowd, all wearing their poppies with pride, gathered outside the cathedral ahead of the wreath-laying ceremony at 10.50am, with the start and end of the two minute silence marked by the playing of the Last Post.

Wreaths were laid on the city’s war memorial by dignitaries including Mayor of Worcester Councillor Roger Berry and Worcester MP Robin Walker, as well as members of the armed forces and other organisations.

College Street was closed in both directions as hundreds of people surrounded the war memorial to listen to readings from the Dean of Worcester, the Very Rev Peter Atkinson, and Bishop of Worcester the Rt Rev Dr John Inge.

The Worcester Male Voice Choir led the hymn singing, which was accompanied by the Salvation Army band.

The wreath-laying service followed a public service in the cathedral at 10am, which was attended by veterans, members of the Royal British Legion and member of the public, as well as deputy lord lieutenant Angela Brinton, Coun Berry, Mr Walker and other city dignitaries.

Members of the Boys’ Brigade band joined the parade to the cathedral.

Speaking after the service, Mr Walker said: “There was a fantastic turnout this morning, best I have ever seen. I think the beautiful weather probably helped with that.

“Every year there seems to be a bigger crowd for the service. It’s always a real privilege to take part in that and today’s was very special.

“There was even more people outside the cathedral and the High Street was very densely packed.

“It just goes to show how passionate people are and how much they care about the armed services.”

Mr Walker added that the Dean’s sermon during the service inside the cathedral dral was “very impressive”.

Other groups involved in yesterday’s service included serving officers, the Territorial Army, Navy, Army and Air Force Cadets, St John Ambulance, and Scouts and Guides.

After the two-minute silence, the deputy lord lieutenant and the mayor took the salute outside the Guildhall as veterans and uniformed organisations marched past.

Elsewhere in Worcester, a service took place in St John in Bedwardine from 10am, followed by a wreath-laying.

In Claines, a parade of RBL members and the 8th Worcester Scouts and Guides took place from the Church Hall in Cornmeadow Lane to St John the Baptist Church,.

At 11am, a minute’s silence took place at the cenotaph, followed by a wreath laying ceremony and then a service inside the church.

In Malvern, a remembrance service took place at the Great Malvern library war memorial at 10.45am and was later followed by a parade and service at Malvern Priory at 3pm.

At 7pm, the Malvern Male Voice Choir performed a concert at the Church of Ascension in Somers Park Avenue.

In Evesham, the parade marched from Market Square along Bridge Street to Abbey Park war memorial, where respects were paid to the fallen during the wreath-laying ceremony before a service at All Saints’ Church.

In Pershore, the wreath-laying and remembrance service took place inside the abbey. Before a parade from the leisure centre at 10.15am, pupils from Pershore High School laid wreaths at Abbey Park memorial garden.

In Droitwich, there was a parade from Victoria Square at 10.30am then a wreath-laying and a service at St Andrew’s Church.

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

11:37am Mon 12 Nov 12

longpete says...

Please can be get out of this American habit of referring to all servicemen and women as "heroes". A hero is someone who has performed a heroic act. In the UK they would get the VC.

A fallen soldier was undoubtedly brave (and as such doesn't need the epithet to be added as in "our brave lads" - it's tautological), but probably not a hero.

But in general, they're just people for whom the services were the only hope out of the unemployment treadmill (or who were simply conscripted). They were (and are still being) used as cannon-fodder by the rich and powerful who were certainly not brave enough to fight their own wars from anywhere other than behind a safe desk. Those same rich and powerful men are now persuading us to call them "heroes" because "dupes" doesn't sound as nice.

And as long as we keep remembering them, and as long as we keep calling them "heroes" and pretend they're fighting for their country, our governments will keep on spending billions of our taxes on killing-machines, and on killing them and other people, rather than on things that will benefit us.

To see David Cameron whiz back from flogging arms to under-developed dictatorships so he could lay his wreath at the Cenotaph was sickening.
Please can be get out of this American habit of referring to all servicemen and women as "heroes". A hero is someone who has performed a heroic act. In the UK they would get the VC. A fallen soldier was undoubtedly brave (and as such doesn't need the epithet to be added as in "our brave lads" - it's tautological), but probably not a hero. But in general, they're just people for whom the services were the only hope out of the unemployment treadmill (or who were simply conscripted). They were (and are still being) used as cannon-fodder by the rich and powerful who were certainly not brave enough to fight their own wars from anywhere other than behind a safe desk. Those same rich and powerful men are now persuading us to call them "heroes" because "dupes" doesn't sound as nice. And as long as we keep remembering them, and as long as we keep calling them "heroes" and pretend they're fighting for their country, our governments will keep on spending billions of our taxes on killing-machines, and on killing them and other people, rather than on things that will benefit us. To see David Cameron whiz back from flogging arms to under-developed dictatorships so he could lay his wreath at the Cenotaph was sickening. longpete
  • Score: 0

6:13pm Mon 12 Nov 12

Olga says...

longpete wrote:
Please can be get out of this American habit of referring to all servicemen and women as "heroes". A hero is someone who has performed a heroic act. In the UK they would get the VC.

A fallen soldier was undoubtedly brave (and as such doesn't need the epithet to be added as in "our brave lads" - it's tautological), but probably not a hero.

But in general, they're just people for whom the services were the only hope out of the unemployment treadmill (or who were simply conscripted). They were (and are still being) used as cannon-fodder by the rich and powerful who were certainly not brave enough to fight their own wars from anywhere other than behind a safe desk. Those same rich and powerful men are now persuading us to call them "heroes" because "dupes" doesn't sound as nice.

And as long as we keep remembering them, and as long as we keep calling them "heroes" and pretend they're fighting for their country, our governments will keep on spending billions of our taxes on killing-machines, and on killing them and other people, rather than on things that will benefit us.

To see David Cameron whiz back from flogging arms to under-developed dictatorships so he could lay his wreath at the Cenotaph was sickening.
What a total load of tosh......

This is a good testiment to service people who have fought throughout the years to protect your right to express offensive, total rubbish without punishment.

Don't kid yourself, without the armed forces over the years we wouldn't have the opportunity to express ourselves.
[quote][p][bold]longpete[/bold] wrote: Please can be get out of this American habit of referring to all servicemen and women as "heroes". A hero is someone who has performed a heroic act. In the UK they would get the VC. A fallen soldier was undoubtedly brave (and as such doesn't need the epithet to be added as in "our brave lads" - it's tautological), but probably not a hero. But in general, they're just people for whom the services were the only hope out of the unemployment treadmill (or who were simply conscripted). They were (and are still being) used as cannon-fodder by the rich and powerful who were certainly not brave enough to fight their own wars from anywhere other than behind a safe desk. Those same rich and powerful men are now persuading us to call them "heroes" because "dupes" doesn't sound as nice. And as long as we keep remembering them, and as long as we keep calling them "heroes" and pretend they're fighting for their country, our governments will keep on spending billions of our taxes on killing-machines, and on killing them and other people, rather than on things that will benefit us. To see David Cameron whiz back from flogging arms to under-developed dictatorships so he could lay his wreath at the Cenotaph was sickening.[/p][/quote]What a total load of tosh...... This is a good testiment to service people who have fought throughout the years to protect your right to express offensive, total rubbish without punishment. Don't kid yourself, without the armed forces over the years we wouldn't have the opportunity to express ourselves. Olga
  • Score: 0

9:35am Tue 13 Nov 12

longpete says...

Olga, it's you who are talking rubbish and doing a dis-service to the generations of soldiers to come by trying to perpetuate the myth that they're heroes dying for our freedom. (Go on, put your hand on your heart as you say it.)

WWII is the only time, ever, that British soldiers have died for the freedom of the British. And WWII only existed because of the monstrous reparations exacted on Germany for WWI, which was nothing more than a disastrous land-grab by the French (who wanted Alsace - that they stole from the Germans in the first place - back) and the British (who wanted Germany's African colonies), both of whom were also wary of a recently united Germany's increasing power.

All the rest since is just pure colonialism. It increased your standard of living (and above all, further lined the pockets of the rich) at the expense of people's freedom the other side of the world.

And your freedom is gradually being wiped away by the same rich and powerful people who are now convincing you that you have to be watched by CCTV, have your mail inspected and your phones tapped in the name of the "war on terrorism" that their foreign policies have manufactured.
Olga, it's you who are talking rubbish and doing a dis-service to the generations of soldiers to come by trying to perpetuate the myth that they're heroes dying for our freedom. (Go on, put your hand on your heart as you say it.) WWII is the only time, ever, that British soldiers have died for the freedom of the British. And WWII only existed because of the monstrous reparations exacted on Germany for WWI, which was nothing more than a disastrous land-grab by the French (who wanted Alsace - that they stole from the Germans in the first place - back) and the British (who wanted Germany's African colonies), both of whom were also wary of a recently united Germany's increasing power. All the rest since is just pure colonialism. It increased your standard of living (and above all, further lined the pockets of the rich) at the expense of people's freedom the other side of the world. And your freedom is gradually being wiped away by the same rich and powerful people who are now convincing you that you have to be watched by CCTV, have your mail inspected and your phones tapped in the name of the "war on terrorism" that their foreign policies have manufactured. longpete
  • Score: 0

6:54pm Tue 13 Nov 12

Olga says...

I stand by my first line.....
I stand by my first line..... Olga
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree