Tree experts called to ash dieback alert on Malvern Hills

DEAD: Ash dieback disease

DEAD: Ash dieback disease

First published in News by

POTENTIAL sightings of ash dieback disease in and around Malvern are being investigated.

While there remain no confirmed cases of the devastating chalara fraxinea infection in the county, three suspected sightings have been reported to Malvern Hills Conservators, who have passed them on to the Forestry Commission.

One suspected case is in an ash wood on Conservators land near British Camp.

The others are nearer the centre of Malvern, and at Poolbrook.

The ash dieback outbreak has already been confirmed in Warwickshire and Shropshire and the Forestry Commission is working seven days a week investigating suspected sightings across the country.

There are estimated to be at least two million ash trees in Worcestershire and experts from Worcestershire Wildlife Trust have warned it is “inevitable” the disease will arrive at some point and that it could potentially wipe out thousands of trees.

Jenny Palmer, deputy conservation officer at Malvern Hills Conservators, said field staff and volunteer wardens are on constant lookout for cases but that all investigations are being handled through the official Forestry Commission process.

“We anticipate many more calls and enquiries in the forthcoming days and weeks,” she said.

“Unfortunately we do not have the resources or in-house expertise to investigate suspected cases as such we ask that members of the public report any suspected cases of ash dieback to the Forestry Commission.”

She said she believed it “unlikely” that the suspected sightings would prove to be genuine cases, adding that it is very difficult to tell whether or not trees are infected as it the time of year when they are already dropping their leaves.

"Worcestershire Wildlife Trust says it has not had any suspected sightings on its land but remains “extremely vigilant”.

Anyone who suspects a case of ash disease should check guidelines on the Forestry Commission website before calling 08459 335577 or e-mailing plant.health@forestry.gsi.gov.uk

Anyone reporting sightings on Conservators land is asked to copy in jennifer@malvernhills.org.uk when reporting.

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

2:15pm Tue 20 Nov 12

Davo-vern says...

Hoping that this is a wrong identification.
Hoping that this is a wrong identification. Davo-vern
  • Score: 0

3:31pm Tue 20 Nov 12

Old Scrumpy says...

Needs caution ... cannot just cut trees in ignorance. Some trees have been shown to display a degree of resistance. We should not fell rampantly. Autumn is difficult to identify the disease. This issue needs more study ... not as obvious as Dutch Elm.
Needs caution ... cannot just cut trees in ignorance. Some trees have been shown to display a degree of resistance. We should not fell rampantly. Autumn is difficult to identify the disease. This issue needs more study ... not as obvious as Dutch Elm. Old Scrumpy
  • Score: 0

4:16pm Tue 20 Nov 12

Arthur Blenkinsop says...

I am still amazed that this disease was know about as long ago as 2005 in Austria, has been known about across Europe since 2008, and still the import of Ash saplings has been allowed to continue, until, surprise surprise, we now also have a problem with it in the UK.
I am still amazed that this disease was know about as long ago as 2005 in Austria, has been known about across Europe since 2008, and still the import of Ash saplings has been allowed to continue, until, surprise surprise, we now also have a problem with it in the UK. Arthur Blenkinsop
  • Score: 0

6:04pm Tue 20 Nov 12

pudniw_gib says...

I doubt very much that the Conservators give a stuff about the ash trees as there is a policy of felling everything across the hills anyway.
Usually to give better views of the town so the Sunday Brummy tourists can see some lovely urban sprawl and feel right at home.
I doubt very much that the Conservators give a stuff about the ash trees as there is a policy of felling everything across the hills anyway. Usually to give better views of the town so the Sunday Brummy tourists can see some lovely urban sprawl and feel right at home. pudniw_gib
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree