‘More hospital places will lead to inappropriate admissions’ in Worcestershire, says health boss

Worcester News: Simon Trickett says raising expertise is as important as more beds Simon Trickett says raising expertise is as important as more beds

INCREASING the number of hospital beds is not the answer to mounting pressures on the health system in Worcester, according to one expert.

Simon Trickett, chief operating officer at South Worcestershire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), believes demand will always be predicated by availability and simply throwing money at extra beds will not solve anything.

“We could probably open another 500 beds and in a few weeks they would be full,” he said.

“Yes, we need to invest in acute capacity, but that does not necessarily mean beds.

“Beds are worth nothing at all without the right range of expertise to treat the people who are filling them.”

The debate, at the latest governing body meeting of South Worcestershire CCG, follows the recent publication of a new report into emergency care by national NHS medical director Sir Bruce Keogh.

Along with plans for a new two-tier system of A&Es, he is looking to implement a wider transformation of the “unsustainable” urgent care system, to enhance care in the community and keep people away from hospitals as much as possible.

And for South Worcestershire CCG, which has an NHS budget of more than £300 million to provide for the health needs of about 292,000 people, that means reducing the amount of time people spend in hospitals, as much as the sheer number of admissions.

“The expertise that needs to be in place must be at the front door, rather than at the back end of the system once patients have been kicking around the hospital system for a few weeks,” said Mr Trickett.

Dr Carl Ellson, chief clinical officer of South Worcestershire CCG, warned that hospitals can be “very dangerous places”, especially for frail elderly people.

“Evidence shows that bed capacity is not the answer because it leads to inappropriate admissions,” he said.

“Rather than investing in bed capacity we need to invest in the expertise to get people home as soon as possible.”

Comments (7)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

11:52am Fri 6 Dec 13

inkiponk says...

They need to get some specialist doctors in to. Especially in children's department / ward. Anything complicated and they haven't got a clue. It's a disgrace that in a 2013 hospital, there no I.T.U unit for children, or specialists in neurology or neurosugery. It's a twobit hospital
They need to get some specialist doctors in to. Especially in children's department / ward. Anything complicated and they haven't got a clue. It's a disgrace that in a 2013 hospital, there no I.T.U unit for children, or specialists in neurology or neurosugery. It's a twobit hospital inkiponk

12:36pm Fri 6 Dec 13

rubalish says...

Tell me about it .When my husband was in there with a massive stroke they kept waiting for so long he was so anxious & stressful he was falling of the trolley how long does it take to calm a person down with medication to enable them to C.T.scan .
The after care was appalling he died two days later in terrible conditions I will never forgive them as long as I live for the total lack of care and expertise.
Fancy putting a stroke victim on M.A.U with no palliative care well no care at all in fact when asked why no observations were done later that day I was told they were done when he came in the previous night . I had to ask for mouth swabs suction to be done act .
This hospital needs to employ nurses who care and expert Doctors who know what they are doing .Since the old Doctors have retired this hospital has gone down hill .
I have heard so many times of them wanting to send people out who are still to ill to go home , in two cases it was the physiotherapist who picked up that they were not well enough to go .
Frightening hey ?
Hope I never end up Worcester Hospital .
Tell me about it .When my husband was in there with a massive stroke they kept waiting for so long he was so anxious & stressful he was falling of the trolley how long does it take to calm a person down with medication to enable them to C.T.scan . The after care was appalling he died two days later in terrible conditions I will never forgive them as long as I live for the total lack of care and expertise. Fancy putting a stroke victim on M.A.U with no palliative care well no care at all in fact when asked why no observations were done later that day I was told they were done when he came in the previous night . I had to ask for mouth swabs suction to be done act . This hospital needs to employ nurses who care and expert Doctors who know what they are doing .Since the old Doctors have retired this hospital has gone down hill . I have heard so many times of them wanting to send people out who are still to ill to go home , in two cases it was the physiotherapist who picked up that they were not well enough to go . Frightening hey ? Hope I never end up Worcester Hospital . rubalish

10:34pm Fri 6 Dec 13

tub_thumper says...

@rubalish

As heartfelt as your story is, this article has nothing to do with expressing how upset you are with the hospital. What it does express is the hospital having too many beds - which is strange as a shut ward on Aconbury East (the old Newtown hospital building) has just re-opened with 17 beds. This ward is for patients for rehabilitation and transitional care needs (also for those with palliative care needs). From my experience, the staff team are excellent and sometimes show signs of being under pressure. A lot of wards are understaffed and the paperwork is huge.

MAU provides a service for the rapid assessment and treatment of a wide range of medical conditions - this may include stroke patients. After patients have been assessed, they will either be admitted to an appropriate medical ward, treated on MAU or allowed home. What were your husbands circumstances? What were his needs?

And what evidence do you have of doctors wanting to send ill patients home? If patients are medically fit for discharge then that is ok. If patients have mobility issues then the physiotherapists will have the final say...

The staff are allowed to get stressed too - they are human at the end of the day...
@rubalish As heartfelt as your story is, this article has nothing to do with expressing how upset you are with the hospital. What it does express is the hospital having too many beds - which is strange as a shut ward on Aconbury East (the old Newtown hospital building) has just re-opened with 17 beds. This ward is for patients for rehabilitation and transitional care needs (also for those with palliative care needs). From my experience, the staff team are excellent and sometimes show signs of being under pressure. A lot of wards are understaffed and the paperwork is huge. MAU provides a service for the rapid assessment and treatment of a wide range of medical conditions - this may include stroke patients. After patients have been assessed, they will either be admitted to an appropriate medical ward, treated on MAU or allowed home. What were your husbands circumstances? What were his needs? And what evidence do you have of doctors wanting to send ill patients home? If patients are medically fit for discharge then that is ok. If patients have mobility issues then the physiotherapists will have the final say... The staff are allowed to get stressed too - they are human at the end of the day... tub_thumper

11:56am Sun 8 Dec 13

Jabbadad says...

There will always be the case here and there that goes wrong and when it impacts on your family then understandibly the emotions run high.
But the discussions on Hospital discharge frequently appear at meetings I attend. And usually there are genuine discussions, but any sensible observer can see that without the Hospitals and the Social Services Care in the Home being able to act together and overcome the issues Normally who pays what, which really calls for pooled NHS and Social Care Funding, since under a system that politicians have introduced, or allowed to remain, each seem to go to great lenghts to defend their funding.
As with additional care in the home it calls for more responsibility from relatives deliverd free. But we have seen a U Turn in this policy whereby there is now a Funding Cap on the cost of Care in the Home, and unless the family will cover the shortfall then the Patient is required to move to a Care Home at lesser costs to the Social services.
So I feel that the problems will not be solved by the many meetings that take place since they all know the answers but don't have the funding to impliment them.
There will always be the case here and there that goes wrong and when it impacts on your family then understandibly the emotions run high. But the discussions on Hospital discharge frequently appear at meetings I attend. And usually there are genuine discussions, but any sensible observer can see that without the Hospitals and the Social Services Care in the Home being able to act together and overcome the issues Normally who pays what, which really calls for pooled NHS and Social Care Funding, since under a system that politicians have introduced, or allowed to remain, each seem to go to great lenghts to defend their funding. As with additional care in the home it calls for more responsibility from relatives deliverd free. But we have seen a U Turn in this policy whereby there is now a Funding Cap on the cost of Care in the Home, and unless the family will cover the shortfall then the Patient is required to move to a Care Home at lesser costs to the Social services. So I feel that the problems will not be solved by the many meetings that take place since they all know the answers but don't have the funding to impliment them. Jabbadad

12:22pm Sun 8 Dec 13

green49 says...

“Evidence shows that bed capacity is not the answer because it leads to inappropriate admissions,” he said.

It is also inappropriate not to have beds for the sick and needy, WRH is a disgrace as far as i am concerned and it is run by ineffecient managers who are responsible for getting whats needed for everyones health,
tub_thumper says;;; And what evidence do you have of doctors wanting to send ill patients home? If patients are medically fit for discharge then that is ok. If patients have mobility issues then the physiotherapists will have the final say...green says
Go get the Freedom of info on that,,, it all it makes shocking reading and i have also had first hand experience of it aswell, I hope i dont end up in the filthy WRH, you go home worse than you went in.
“Evidence shows that bed capacity is not the answer because it leads to inappropriate admissions,” he said. It is also inappropriate not to have beds for the sick and needy, WRH is a disgrace as far as i am concerned and it is run by ineffecient managers who are responsible for getting whats needed for everyones health, tub_thumper says;;; And what evidence do you have of doctors wanting to send ill patients home? If patients are medically fit for discharge then that is ok. If patients have mobility issues then the physiotherapists will have the final say...green says Go get the Freedom of info on that,,, it all it makes shocking reading and i have also had first hand experience of it aswell, I hope i dont end up in the filthy WRH, you go home worse than you went in. green49

6:50pm Sun 8 Dec 13

tub_thumper says...

Can I remind everyone that this story is about hospital beds - NOT a story about slagging off the "filthy" WRH.
Can I remind everyone that this story is about hospital beds - NOT a story about slagging off the "filthy" WRH. tub_thumper

12:02pm Thu 12 Dec 13

inkiponk says...

tub_thumper wrote:
@rubalish

As heartfelt as your story is, this article has nothing to do with expressing how upset you are with the hospital. What it does express is the hospital having too many beds - which is strange as a shut ward on Aconbury East (the old Newtown hospital building) has just re-opened with 17 beds. This ward is for patients for rehabilitation and transitional care needs (also for those with palliative care needs). From my experience, the staff team are excellent and sometimes show signs of being under pressure. A lot of wards are understaffed and the paperwork is huge.

MAU provides a service for the rapid assessment and treatment of a wide range of medical conditions - this may include stroke patients. After patients have been assessed, they will either be admitted to an appropriate medical ward, treated on MAU or allowed home. What were your husbands circumstances? What were his needs?

And what evidence do you have of doctors wanting to send ill patients home? If patients are medically fit for discharge then that is ok. If patients have mobility issues then the physiotherapists will have the final say...

The staff are allowed to get stressed too - they are human at the end of the day...
We have major evidence of sending ill patients home. My daughter for example. They said she was faking epilepsy and sent her home on morphine and a high dose of diazapam! This is a 10 year old girl i may add and all without an actual doctor examining her! Then ended up being blue lighted to resus the next day with an epileptic fit and ended up in I.T.U in birmingham childrens!
[quote][p][bold]tub_thumper[/bold] wrote: @rubalish As heartfelt as your story is, this article has nothing to do with expressing how upset you are with the hospital. What it does express is the hospital having too many beds - which is strange as a shut ward on Aconbury East (the old Newtown hospital building) has just re-opened with 17 beds. This ward is for patients for rehabilitation and transitional care needs (also for those with palliative care needs). From my experience, the staff team are excellent and sometimes show signs of being under pressure. A lot of wards are understaffed and the paperwork is huge. MAU provides a service for the rapid assessment and treatment of a wide range of medical conditions - this may include stroke patients. After patients have been assessed, they will either be admitted to an appropriate medical ward, treated on MAU or allowed home. What were your husbands circumstances? What were his needs? And what evidence do you have of doctors wanting to send ill patients home? If patients are medically fit for discharge then that is ok. If patients have mobility issues then the physiotherapists will have the final say... The staff are allowed to get stressed too - they are human at the end of the day...[/p][/quote]We have major evidence of sending ill patients home. My daughter for example. They said she was faking epilepsy and sent her home on morphine and a high dose of diazapam! This is a 10 year old girl i may add and all without an actual doctor examining her! Then ended up being blue lighted to resus the next day with an epileptic fit and ended up in I.T.U in birmingham childrens! inkiponk

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree