Battle of Worcester mystery too big - even for the Time Team

Worcester News: Tony Robinson said the mystery would be too difficult to solve in three days Tony Robinson said the mystery would be too difficult to solve in three days

A MYSTERY which has captured the imagination of Worcester historians for hundreds of years has proved too big even for Tony Robinson and his Time Team crew.

The question of where the bodies of the thousands killed in the Battle of Worcester – the final battle of the English Civil War – are buried has long been a fascination for history experts.

Chairman of the Battle of Worcester Society, Grant Simmonds, said the group’s patron Lord Faulkner recently came up with a cunning plan to invite the former Blackadder actor and his Time Team crew to the city to investigate.

“There’s so much we don’t know about the Battle of Worcester. One of the greatest mysteries is where the bodies were buried.

“We know that about 3,000 Scots and hundreds on the parliamentary side died and they must be buried somewhere.

“Some people think it was in the Cathedral green and others in Fort Royal Hill.

“Other people have said they might be in the car park behind Sidbury which is due to become the arts quarter.”

Mr Simmonds said he had emailed Mr Robinson suggesting one of the forthcoming Time Team specials should look into the mystery.

But the actor-turned-history expert replied saying the project was interesting but would not be feasible within the programme’s three-day restriction.

“He was very polite and extremely sympathetic,” Mr Simmonds said.

“But he said the programme only has three days to film and really, where would they start?

“Also, digging into the ring road probably wouldn’t go down very well with the people of Worcester.”

The battle, on September 3, 1651, saw Oliver Cromwell and the parliamentarians defeat King Charles II’s royalist forces after they captured Fort Royal.

But he said the organisation would continue to investigate the mystery and hoped one day to know the truth about where those that died were laid to rest.

“It would raise the profile of the battle – if it hadn’t ended the way it did our whole history would be different,” he said. 

“It’s something for the future.”

For more information on the Battle of Worcester Society visit thebattleofworcestersociety.org.uk.

Comments (11)

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10:29am Tue 14 Jan 14

Ted Elgar says...

http://www.pen-and-s
word.co.uk/Worcester
-1651/p/615/

Worcester 1651
Malcolm Atkin
ISBN 9781844150809

.. or you could just read this.
http://www.pen-and-s word.co.uk/Worcester -1651/p/615/ Worcester 1651 Malcolm Atkin ISBN 9781844150809 .. or you could just read this. Ted Elgar
  • Score: 3

8:18am Thu 16 Jan 14

johnowat says...

I always thought and belived it was Whittington tump :)
I always thought and belived it was Whittington tump :) johnowat
  • Score: 0

10:34am Thu 16 Jan 14

Dilip Sarkar says...

I did a massive amount of research into this years ago, with Bob Jenkins, and received the same understandable response from Time Team in 2006. Using LIDAR tiles and contemporary documentary evidence we've a good idea in which area most of the dead were buried and we intended some years ago to stage an archaeological conference to progress serious research into the matter. Unfortunately after I left the Battle of Worcester Society, of which I was a founding member, the matter was not pursued and my personal historical interests went off in another direction. This, however, is a project that needs concluding.
I did a massive amount of research into this years ago, with Bob Jenkins, and received the same understandable response from Time Team in 2006. Using LIDAR tiles and contemporary documentary evidence we've a good idea in which area most of the dead were buried and we intended some years ago to stage an archaeological conference to progress serious research into the matter. Unfortunately after I left the Battle of Worcester Society, of which I was a founding member, the matter was not pursued and my personal historical interests went off in another direction. This, however, is a project that needs concluding. Dilip Sarkar
  • Score: 1

12:18pm Thu 16 Jan 14

mack18 says...

Was an area over towards Hallow not mentioned some time ago regarding this subject?
Was an area over towards Hallow not mentioned some time ago regarding this subject? mack18
  • Score: -1

2:34pm Thu 16 Jan 14

green49 says...

Lets just hope this subject is taken up by someone?
Lets just hope this subject is taken up by someone? green49
  • Score: 0

7:37am Fri 17 Jan 14

The Doosra says...

The article is a little bit academic as Channel 4 in their infinite (not) wisdom are no longer commissioning Time Team programmes.
The article is a little bit academic as Channel 4 in their infinite (not) wisdom are no longer commissioning Time Team programmes. The Doosra
  • Score: 0

2:17pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Windy Miller says...

A contingent of French soldiers were buried at The Moats in Frenchlands Lane Lower Broadheath and before the First World War villagers laid flowers on the site.
A contingent of French soldiers were buried at The Moats in Frenchlands Lane Lower Broadheath and before the First World War villagers laid flowers on the site. Windy Miller
  • Score: -1

2:46pm Fri 17 Jan 14

mauro balbino says...

green49 wrote:
Lets just hope this subject is taken up by someone?
This comment received a thumb down...

I try to understand why people thumb down irony, sarcasm and even good jokes, but a sincere wish to see knowledge going forward?

I am thumbing it up not to set the score back to neutral, but because it is the right thing I can do whilst my right.

If anybody else thumbed it down, please provide an explanation if possible, I am really trying to understand why people would object further research or simply other people taking charge.

For the article itself, the only commentary I make is that it is a pity we have not an archaeological team providing us with a fifty minutes documentary and possibly years of follow-up research.
[quote][p][bold]green49[/bold] wrote: Lets just hope this subject is taken up by someone?[/p][/quote]This comment received a thumb down... I try to understand why people thumb down irony, sarcasm and even good jokes, but a sincere wish to see knowledge going forward? I am thumbing it up not to set the score back to neutral, but because it is the right thing I can do whilst my right. If anybody else thumbed it down, please provide an explanation if possible, I am really trying to understand why people would object further research or simply other people taking charge. For the article itself, the only commentary I make is that it is a pity we have not an archaeological team providing us with a fifty minutes documentary and possibly years of follow-up research. mauro balbino
  • Score: -1

3:10pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Windy Miller says...

Whittington Tump is a melting Glacial Clay deposit. There are others in the Severn Valley.
Whittington Tump is a melting Glacial Clay deposit. There are others in the Severn Valley. Windy Miller
  • Score: -1

3:15pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Windy Miller says...

Whittington Tump is a melting Glacial Clay deposit. There are others in the Severn Valley.
A ground radar study of the Frenchlands Site could be revealing.
Whittington Tump is a melting Glacial Clay deposit. There are others in the Severn Valley. A ground radar study of the Frenchlands Site could be revealing. Windy Miller
  • Score: 0

8:38am Sun 19 Jan 14

mauro balbino says...

To whom it may concern,

This free eBook gives you the know-how to get around and to be forewarned on what to expect from life on an archaeological dig.

"(...) informative, amusing and sometimes touching collection of articles by archaeological dig volunteers."


http://www.biblicala
rchaeology.org/free-
ebooks/i-volunteered
-for-this-life-on-an
-archaeological-dig/
?mqsc=E3725876&utm_s
ource=WhatCountsEmai
l&utm_medium=BHDWeek
inReviewNewsletter&u
tm_campaign=E4B118
To whom it may concern, This free eBook gives you the know-how to get around and to be forewarned on what to expect from life on an archaeological dig. "(...) informative, amusing and sometimes touching collection of articles by archaeological dig volunteers." http://www.biblicala rchaeology.org/free- ebooks/i-volunteered -for-this-life-on-an -archaeological-dig/ ?mqsc=E3725876&utm_s ource=WhatCountsEmai l&utm_medium=BHDWeek inReviewNewsletter&u tm_campaign=E4B118 mauro balbino
  • Score: 0

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