Butterfly numbers flutter up chart

The Clouded Yellow butterfly, which has shot up in numbers since 2012.

The Clouded Yellow butterfly, which has shot up in numbers since 2012.

First published in News

ONE of the country's favourite insects has been fluttering past our windows more regularly recently.

The number of butterfly sightings in gardens, including here in Worcester, increased last summer but is still below average.

Forty six out of the 56 species studied in 2013 recorded an annual increase compared with 2012, the worst butterfly year since records began in 1976.

However, the warm weather saw a large influx of some migrant species with numbers of Clouded Yellow butterflies from mainland Europe up by 4,373 compared with 2012.

“The recovery of butterflies in 2013 was highly welcome but there is still a long way to go before butterflies return to former glories," said Dr Tom Brereton, head of monitoring at Butterfly Conservation.

“Our ongoing monitoring efforts will be vital in assessing whether we are on track to reverse butterfly declines and rebuild a healthy countryside.”

Comments (4)

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5:18pm Mon 7 Apr 14

lizzyloolah says...

Every year I plant a cabbages randomly among the plants in my garden and see hundreds of caterpillars.
Every year I plant a cabbages randomly among the plants in my garden and see hundreds of caterpillars. lizzyloolah
  • Score: 0

8:22pm Mon 7 Apr 14

New Kid on the Block says...

lizzyloolah wrote:
Every year I plant a cabbages randomly among the plants in my garden and see hundreds of caterpillars.
Every year I wage war on the caterpillars on my cabbages.
[quote][p][bold]lizzyloolah[/bold] wrote: Every year I plant a cabbages randomly among the plants in my garden and see hundreds of caterpillars.[/p][/quote]Every year I wage war on the caterpillars on my cabbages. New Kid on the Block
  • Score: 0

9:54pm Mon 7 Apr 14

lizzyloolah says...

New Kid on the Block wrote:
lizzyloolah wrote:
Every year I plant a cabbages randomly among the plants in my garden and see hundreds of caterpillars.
Every year I wage war on the caterpillars on my cabbages.
Try planting some nasturtium, caterpillars love those.
[quote][p][bold]New Kid on the Block[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]lizzyloolah[/bold] wrote: Every year I plant a cabbages randomly among the plants in my garden and see hundreds of caterpillars.[/p][/quote]Every year I wage war on the caterpillars on my cabbages.[/p][/quote]Try planting some nasturtium, caterpillars love those. lizzyloolah
  • Score: 2

4:43pm Tue 8 Apr 14

New Kid on the Block says...

lizzyloolah wrote:
New Kid on the Block wrote:
lizzyloolah wrote:
Every year I plant a cabbages randomly among the plants in my garden and see hundreds of caterpillars.
Every year I wage war on the caterpillars on my cabbages.
Try planting some nasturtium, caterpillars love those.
Of all the 59 species of Butterfly , and the moths, resident in the British Isles the one I don't want to encourage is the Cabbage White!
There are many other species that I positively encourage to come and visit my garden. I plant lots of nectar rich flowers hoping to encourage the less common and often more beautiful species of butterfly.
I particularly notice that the cinnabar moth is much rarer than it used to be. The striped caterpillars used to be very common and would be much appreciated by anyone who has a problem with ragwort or groundsel.
My Buddleia is frequently covered in visiting butterflies.
I just don't want to encourage things that try and eat my food before I do. For the very same reasons most birds are welcomed in my garden but not Pigeons.
[quote][p][bold]lizzyloolah[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]New Kid on the Block[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]lizzyloolah[/bold] wrote: Every year I plant a cabbages randomly among the plants in my garden and see hundreds of caterpillars.[/p][/quote]Every year I wage war on the caterpillars on my cabbages.[/p][/quote]Try planting some nasturtium, caterpillars love those.[/p][/quote]Of all the 59 species of Butterfly , and the moths, resident in the British Isles the one I don't want to encourage is the Cabbage White! There are many other species that I positively encourage to come and visit my garden. I plant lots of nectar rich flowers hoping to encourage the less common and often more beautiful species of butterfly. I particularly notice that the cinnabar moth is much rarer than it used to be. The striped caterpillars used to be very common and would be much appreciated by anyone who has a problem with ragwort or groundsel. My Buddleia is frequently covered in visiting butterflies. I just don't want to encourage things that try and eat my food before I do. For the very same reasons most birds are welcomed in my garden but not Pigeons. New Kid on the Block
  • Score: 0

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