Tory and Green in fresh war of words

Worcester News: Councillor Neil Laurenson, from Worcester Green Party Councillor Neil Laurenson, from Worcester Green Party

THE only Green Party representative on Worcester City Council has hit back at claims from one political rival that he is “pseudo-Labour”.

Councillor Marc Bayliss, deputy Tory group leader, has reopened an old feud with Cllr Neil Laurenson by calling him “Labour in disguise” and saying he is trying to fool voters ahead of next month’s elections.

But the attack has been refuted by Cllr Laurenson, who says he is independent of all other parties.

Cllr Laurenson, who made an historic breakthrough for the Greens by winning the party’s first ever city council seat in 2012, helped team up with Labour one year ago to vote through a shock coup to dump the Tories from power.

In recent weeks, he has distanced himself from the Labour administration and even voted against the budget in February, although it went through anyway with Liberal Democrat support.

Cllr Bayliss said: “This is a man who put Labour into power, so for him to pretend he wasn’t involved in any of it is utter nonsense.

“The Greens put them into power and his voting record shows he has kept them there.

“He’s now trying to distance himself from them because he knows being pseudo-Labour is no advantage to them at the elections.

But it doesn’t cut any ice.

“It’s time for the Greens to acknowledge they are Labour in disguise.”

But Cllr Laurenson has dismissed the claims as “nonsense”.

“It’s such a shame that Marc has to resort to this,” he said.

“He’s got a lot to offer, so why he has to make these claims I don’t know.

“I voted against the budget and council tax rise, those are the facts I prefer to stick to and people can judge me on what I do.

“Nobody thinks of elections in February anyway, it’s just nonsense.”

He says in future years, he is prepared to give “serious consideration”

to calling for a referendum to ask people if they are prepared to see higher council tax rises than the current two per cent limit.

When Labour took control of the city council last year, it dumped the Conservatives from power for the first time in 13 years.

The shock coup at the Guildhall saw Tory councillor Simon Geraghty ditched as leader and his entire cabinet dismissed as Labour, the Lib Dem and Green parties all teamed up to kick them out of office.

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

6:19pm Tue 22 Apr 14

voledog says...

“It’s time for the Greens to acknowledge they are Labour in disguise.”

Possibly...but you can't help feeling that the Greens are a hell of a lot nicer than the bigoted half-wits in UKIP, who really are just the nastier side of the Tories in a very transparent disguise.
“It’s time for the Greens to acknowledge they are Labour in disguise.” Possibly...but you can't help feeling that the Greens are a hell of a lot nicer than the bigoted half-wits in UKIP, who really are just the nastier side of the Tories in a very transparent disguise. voledog
  • Score: -1

6:38pm Tue 22 Apr 14

i-cycle says...

A bit rich coming from Marc Bayliss, that well know former Labour councillor. Still anything to get elected eh!
A bit rich coming from Marc Bayliss, that well know former Labour councillor. Still anything to get elected eh! i-cycle
  • Score: 1

10:45pm Tue 22 Apr 14

brooksider says...

Baylis acting like the school bully again, always attacking the weakest.
Baylis acting like the school bully again, always attacking the weakest. brooksider
  • Score: 1

11:25pm Tue 22 Apr 14

i-cycle says...

brooksider wrote:
Baylis acting like the school bully again, always attacking the weakest.
Unfortunately, Bayliss's 'bile' is what passes for 'politics' in our first past the post system. I wonder what Marc when he was a Labour politician would be saying if in Malvern and nationally and even previously in Worcester where the Conservatives rely on left of centre Lib Dem support to prop them up.

Me thinks this all this has more to do with disillusionment with the 'traditional' and 'mainstream" parties and trying to persuade more to vote Conservative instead of defecting to UKIP or the Greens.

Personally I think the biggest issue is that national Government, whether Labour or Conservative, has so emaciated and marginalised Local Government that most voters have realised that local democracy can't make a real difference. The current cuts and externalisation/priv
atisation of public services only serve to compound that problem.

No wonder that voting levels have dropped in local elections. perhaps it is indeed time to send a very strong message to the two major parties that things need to change if local democracy is to be 'refreshed'.

The choice would appear to be to vote Lib Dem, Green or UKIP. I personally have my personal views, but you'll need to make up your own mind as to who to vote for in your local ward in the forthcoming local elections to send a very strong signal to national and local politicians that local democracy is indeed important, relevant and vital if we, in the 'so called' cradle of democracy are to elevate ourselves above and beyond the marginalised and irrelevant state that our local democracy is in.

To me its critical that we should all vote in local elections, not tactically, but critically and for the party that better represents our beliefs about how they will deliver a fairer and more tolerant society that I'm sure we all subscribe to. Above all the best way to exercise your own personal democratic right is to get out there and vote.
[quote][p][bold]brooksider[/bold] wrote: Baylis acting like the school bully again, always attacking the weakest.[/p][/quote]Unfortunately, Bayliss's 'bile' is what passes for 'politics' in our first past the post system. I wonder what Marc when he was a Labour politician would be saying if in Malvern and nationally and even previously in Worcester where the Conservatives rely on left of centre Lib Dem support to prop them up. Me thinks this all this has more to do with disillusionment with the 'traditional' and 'mainstream" parties and trying to persuade more to vote Conservative instead of defecting to UKIP or the Greens. Personally I think the biggest issue is that national Government, whether Labour or Conservative, has so emaciated and marginalised Local Government that most voters have realised that local democracy can't make a real difference. The current cuts and externalisation/priv atisation of public services only serve to compound that problem. No wonder that voting levels have dropped in local elections. perhaps it is indeed time to send a very strong message to the two major parties that things need to change if local democracy is to be 'refreshed'. The choice would appear to be to vote Lib Dem, Green or UKIP. I personally have my personal views, but you'll need to make up your own mind as to who to vote for in your local ward in the forthcoming local elections to send a very strong signal to national and local politicians that local democracy is indeed important, relevant and vital if we, in the 'so called' cradle of democracy are to elevate ourselves above and beyond the marginalised and irrelevant state that our local democracy is in. To me its critical that we should all vote in local elections, not tactically, but critically and for the party that better represents our beliefs about how they will deliver a fairer and more tolerant society that I'm sure we all subscribe to. Above all the best way to exercise your own personal democratic right is to get out there and vote. i-cycle
  • Score: 3

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree