Host of events at the Severn Valley Railway next weekend

The Silver King

Host of events at the Seven Valley Railway next weekend

First published in News
Last updated
by

RAIL enthusiasts have a lot to be excited about next weekend.

In a change from the usual steam-powered locomotives travelling along the Severn Valley Railway, the attraction will instead play host to a 3,000 horse power silver engine.

The Silver King engine and trio of carriages will set off from London Marylebone in the morning, travelling along the Chiltern Line before arriving in Kidderminster and joining the Severn Valley Railway Line.

The train will visit the restored stations at Bewdley, Arley, Highley and Hampton Loade before the end of the line at Bridgnorth, where it will become available for public use on its trip back to Kidderminster.

The following day, Sunday, September 7, Bewdley station will play host to a display of public service vehicles including a 1950’s double decker bus which doubles as a licensed bar.

The On the Buses event will also include sales and information stands.

From Thursday, September 4 until Sunday, September 7 the Campaign for Real Ale will also hold a beer festival with a range of real ales at Bridgnorth station.

For more information or to book tickets call 01905 757 900 or visit www.svr.co.uk.

Comments (6)

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4:33pm Mon 25 Aug 14

skychip says...

Headline incorrectly spelt
Headline incorrectly spelt skychip
  • Score: 6

5:26pm Mon 25 Aug 14

kettle64 says...

A news item or a blatant free advert for Severn Valley Railway?
A news item or a blatant free advert for Severn Valley Railway? kettle64
  • Score: -13

6:42pm Mon 25 Aug 14

CJH says...

kettle64 wrote:
A news item or a blatant free advert for Severn Valley Railway?
It's a charitable trust.
[quote][p][bold]kettle64[/bold] wrote: A news item or a blatant free advert for Severn Valley Railway?[/p][/quote]It's a charitable trust. CJH
  • Score: 13

9:23am Tue 26 Aug 14

MJI says...

I was going to have a dig at the photo, but it is supplied by SVR, I noticed that the picture is af a non motored driving trailer.

To be honest this is not my idea of a train to go to see, I would rather travel behind something British built and much better.

The idea that the average enthusiast would be excited by a foreign built and designed Diesel of lower power than some of our home grown stuff is laughable. When a fifty two year old British Diesel loco is only about ten tons heavier but is three hundred bhp more that the ten year old imported junk, and sounds so much better I think you can understand the point.

People think that Diesels are all the same, but whereas some people lost interest at the end of steam, some lost interest at the Yankisation of our network. Since some of our locos are among the worlds best it is difficult to be enthusiastic about imported stuff.

However it is funny that if a new Yank freight engine stalls on a bank that the British locos they tried and failed to replace are able to push it up as well as pull their own. But then the British company behind that design decided the only way to win the contract was to be better than any potential import.

As to trains still operating every day on the national network give me a High Speed Train any day of the week.
I was going to have a dig at the photo, but it is supplied by SVR, I noticed that the picture is af a non motored driving trailer. To be honest this is not my idea of a train to go to see, I would rather travel behind something British built and much better. The idea that the average enthusiast would be excited by a foreign built and designed Diesel of lower power than some of our home grown stuff is laughable. When a fifty two year old British Diesel loco is only about ten tons heavier but is three hundred bhp more that the ten year old imported junk, and sounds so much better I think you can understand the point. People think that Diesels are all the same, but whereas some people lost interest at the end of steam, some lost interest at the Yankisation of our network. Since some of our locos are among the worlds best it is difficult to be enthusiastic about imported stuff. However it is funny that if a new Yank freight engine stalls on a bank that the British locos they tried and failed to replace are able to push it up as well as pull their own. But then the British company behind that design decided the only way to win the contract was to be better than any potential import. As to trains still operating every day on the national network give me a High Speed Train any day of the week. MJI
  • Score: 2

10:50am Tue 26 Aug 14

farmeralan1963 says...

MJI wrote:
I was going to have a dig at the photo, but it is supplied by SVR, I noticed that the picture is af a non motored driving trailer.

To be honest this is not my idea of a train to go to see, I would rather travel behind something British built and much better.

The idea that the average enthusiast would be excited by a foreign built and designed Diesel of lower power than some of our home grown stuff is laughable. When a fifty two year old British Diesel loco is only about ten tons heavier but is three hundred bhp more that the ten year old imported junk, and sounds so much better I think you can understand the point.

People think that Diesels are all the same, but whereas some people lost interest at the end of steam, some lost interest at the Yankisation of our network. Since some of our locos are among the worlds best it is difficult to be enthusiastic about imported stuff.

However it is funny that if a new Yank freight engine stalls on a bank that the British locos they tried and failed to replace are able to push it up as well as pull their own. But then the British company behind that design decided the only way to win the contract was to be better than any potential import.

As to trains still operating every day on the national network give me a High Speed Train any day of the week.
I assume the locomotive in question is a Class 67? If that's the case, I understand your sentiment as this and the 66 not only resulted in the withdrawal of hundreds of British-built locomotives during the past 10-15 years, some of which were young in locomotive terms (Class 58 and 60), but they also effectively resulted in no further orders for British built locomotives being placed by train companies, with all new ones now American or German built. Although I must say that the 68 and 70 are interesting, but perhaps only because of the ubiquity of the 66s.

Britain still has British companies capable of building rolling stock, it's a shame they're not given the chance. Even the current crop of multiple units ordered since the turn of the century in Britain are foreign, including the thousands of Derby-built Bombardier rolling stock. The last trains built by a British company for use in Britain were the Eurotunnel shuttle locomotives, 20 years ago. The ironic thing is that many mothballed British locos are now seeing service in mainland Europe!
[quote][p][bold]MJI[/bold] wrote: I was going to have a dig at the photo, but it is supplied by SVR, I noticed that the picture is af a non motored driving trailer. To be honest this is not my idea of a train to go to see, I would rather travel behind something British built and much better. The idea that the average enthusiast would be excited by a foreign built and designed Diesel of lower power than some of our home grown stuff is laughable. When a fifty two year old British Diesel loco is only about ten tons heavier but is three hundred bhp more that the ten year old imported junk, and sounds so much better I think you can understand the point. People think that Diesels are all the same, but whereas some people lost interest at the end of steam, some lost interest at the Yankisation of our network. Since some of our locos are among the worlds best it is difficult to be enthusiastic about imported stuff. However it is funny that if a new Yank freight engine stalls on a bank that the British locos they tried and failed to replace are able to push it up as well as pull their own. But then the British company behind that design decided the only way to win the contract was to be better than any potential import. As to trains still operating every day on the national network give me a High Speed Train any day of the week.[/p][/quote]I assume the locomotive in question is a Class 67? If that's the case, I understand your sentiment as this and the 66 not only resulted in the withdrawal of hundreds of British-built locomotives during the past 10-15 years, some of which were young in locomotive terms (Class 58 and 60), but they also effectively resulted in no further orders for British built locomotives being placed by train companies, with all new ones now American or German built. Although I must say that the 68 and 70 are interesting, but perhaps only because of the ubiquity of the 66s. Britain still has British companies capable of building rolling stock, it's a shame they're not given the chance. Even the current crop of multiple units ordered since the turn of the century in Britain are foreign, including the thousands of Derby-built Bombardier rolling stock. The last trains built by a British company for use in Britain were the Eurotunnel shuttle locomotives, 20 years ago. The ironic thing is that many mothballed British locos are now seeing service in mainland Europe! farmeralan1963
  • Score: 2

6:01pm Tue 26 Aug 14

MJI says...

farmeralan1963 wrote:
MJI wrote:
I was going to have a dig at the photo, but it is supplied by SVR, I noticed that the picture is af a non motored driving trailer.

To be honest this is not my idea of a train to go to see, I would rather travel behind something British built and much better.

The idea that the average enthusiast would be excited by a foreign built and designed Diesel of lower power than some of our home grown stuff is laughable. When a fifty two year old British Diesel loco is only about ten tons heavier but is three hundred bhp more that the ten year old imported junk, and sounds so much better I think you can understand the point.

People think that Diesels are all the same, but whereas some people lost interest at the end of steam, some lost interest at the Yankisation of our network. Since some of our locos are among the worlds best it is difficult to be enthusiastic about imported stuff.

However it is funny that if a new Yank freight engine stalls on a bank that the British locos they tried and failed to replace are able to push it up as well as pull their own. But then the British company behind that design decided the only way to win the contract was to be better than any potential import.

As to trains still operating every day on the national network give me a High Speed Train any day of the week.
I assume the locomotive in question is a Class 67? If that's the case, I understand your sentiment as this and the 66 not only resulted in the withdrawal of hundreds of British-built locomotives during the past 10-15 years, some of which were young in locomotive terms (Class 58 and 60), but they also effectively resulted in no further orders for British built locomotives being placed by train companies, with all new ones now American or German built. Although I must say that the 68 and 70 are interesting, but perhaps only because of the ubiquity of the 66s.

Britain still has British companies capable of building rolling stock, it's a shame they're not given the chance. Even the current crop of multiple units ordered since the turn of the century in Britain are foreign, including the thousands of Derby-built Bombardier rolling stock. The last trains built by a British company for use in Britain were the Eurotunnel shuttle locomotives, 20 years ago. The ironic thing is that many mothballed British locos are now seeing service in mainland Europe!
I rate a 60 over a 66 any day and as to 67, inferior to the much older Deltics
[quote][p][bold]farmeralan1963[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MJI[/bold] wrote: I was going to have a dig at the photo, but it is supplied by SVR, I noticed that the picture is af a non motored driving trailer. To be honest this is not my idea of a train to go to see, I would rather travel behind something British built and much better. The idea that the average enthusiast would be excited by a foreign built and designed Diesel of lower power than some of our home grown stuff is laughable. When a fifty two year old British Diesel loco is only about ten tons heavier but is three hundred bhp more that the ten year old imported junk, and sounds so much better I think you can understand the point. People think that Diesels are all the same, but whereas some people lost interest at the end of steam, some lost interest at the Yankisation of our network. Since some of our locos are among the worlds best it is difficult to be enthusiastic about imported stuff. However it is funny that if a new Yank freight engine stalls on a bank that the British locos they tried and failed to replace are able to push it up as well as pull their own. But then the British company behind that design decided the only way to win the contract was to be better than any potential import. As to trains still operating every day on the national network give me a High Speed Train any day of the week.[/p][/quote]I assume the locomotive in question is a Class 67? If that's the case, I understand your sentiment as this and the 66 not only resulted in the withdrawal of hundreds of British-built locomotives during the past 10-15 years, some of which were young in locomotive terms (Class 58 and 60), but they also effectively resulted in no further orders for British built locomotives being placed by train companies, with all new ones now American or German built. Although I must say that the 68 and 70 are interesting, but perhaps only because of the ubiquity of the 66s. Britain still has British companies capable of building rolling stock, it's a shame they're not given the chance. Even the current crop of multiple units ordered since the turn of the century in Britain are foreign, including the thousands of Derby-built Bombardier rolling stock. The last trains built by a British company for use in Britain were the Eurotunnel shuttle locomotives, 20 years ago. The ironic thing is that many mothballed British locos are now seeing service in mainland Europe![/p][/quote]I rate a 60 over a 66 any day and as to 67, inferior to the much older Deltics MJI
  • Score: 0
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