Let’s think through Platini’s sin-bin proposal

Worcester News: Let’s think through Platini’s sin-bin proposal Let’s think through Platini’s sin-bin proposal

IT’S not often I find myself agreeing with Michel Platini but when it comes to the idea of introducing sin-bins instead of yellow cards, I think the UEFA chief is on to a good thing.

While the concept would need to be looked at in detail before getting anywhere near a top-level match, it seems a decent idea.

For a start, it would make players think twice before commiting a cynical foul or making an ill-advised challenge.

If offenders knew a 10-minute spell on the sidelines awaited them, as it does for misdemeanours in rugby union, they might be less reckless.

Managers would also not take too kindly to having their team reduced to 10 men, or less, for players that tread the wrong side of the disciplinary line.

Yet, like everything, it would need to be managed carefully.

First up would be to redefine what would be punished by the sin-bin.

It would need to reflect the crime and therefore sending players off to cool down for the heinous crime of taking their shirt off while celebrating a goal — they currently get a yellow card — would be stupid.

Some referees are quicker to dish out the cards than others, which would inevitably lead to calls of inconsistency and managers complaining that their player should not have been sent to the sin-bin.

I like Platini’s idea, but it needs to be thought through.

Comments (2)

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3:35pm Tue 10 Dec 13

rocketron123@yahoo.com says...

This is not a new idea from Platini. This thought process has been a long standing issue, certainly in this country. The sooner it IS introduced the better. It would certainly have the desired effects on the cheating divers, and giver away of cyncical free kicks. Managers might be more inclined to advise more discipline in their teams as a result of the reduction in team numbers. It certainly works in Rugby Union, so why not football. And we should also consider citing players as they do in Rubgy, and have a video panel look at incidents on a Monday, and dish out retrospective punishments .
This is not a new idea from Platini. This thought process has been a long standing issue, certainly in this country. The sooner it IS introduced the better. It would certainly have the desired effects on the cheating divers, and giver away of cyncical free kicks. Managers might be more inclined to advise more discipline in their teams as a result of the reduction in team numbers. It certainly works in Rugby Union, so why not football. And we should also consider citing players as they do in Rubgy, and have a video panel look at incidents on a Monday, and dish out retrospective punishments . rocketron123@yahoo.com

12:56pm Wed 11 Dec 13

Andy (Ledbury) says...

There is some merit in this long-standing idea - namely that disciplinary responses would be reflected within the game (and against the same opposition) in which indiscretions originally occur. As things stand, a yellow-card accumulation leads to the suspension of a player against later opposition, where in fact that player has committed indiscretions against five or more other clubs, to which the only immediate disciplinary response would be the award of a free-kick.

That said, players do not mostly make cynical or ill-advised tackles intentionally (though some clearly do). Therefore, the move towards a more immediate consequence of a player spending time off the pitch during a game should be assessed against what actually constitutes a yellow-card (or sin-binnable) offence. The details would clearly need to worked out for the particular case goalkeepers, as otherwise temporary substitutions would be needed.
There is some merit in this long-standing idea - namely that disciplinary responses would be reflected within the game (and against the same opposition) in which indiscretions originally occur. As things stand, a yellow-card accumulation leads to the suspension of a player against later opposition, where in fact that player has committed indiscretions against five or more other clubs, to which the only immediate disciplinary response would be the award of a free-kick. That said, players do not mostly make cynical or ill-advised tackles intentionally (though some clearly do). Therefore, the move towards a more immediate consequence of a player spending time off the pitch during a game should be assessed against what actually constitutes a yellow-card (or sin-binnable) offence. The details would clearly need to worked out for the particular case goalkeepers, as otherwise temporary substitutions would be needed. Andy (Ledbury)

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