Magic has gone from the FA Cup

Worcester News: Magic has gone from the FA Cup Magic has gone from the FA Cup

WATCHING the FA Cup over the weekend confirmed a belief I have long held — that the competition has lost its appeal.

While it still attracts a certain degree of prestige, particularly in the early rounds when it is the exclusive domain of non-league clubs, the time when it was compulsive viewing is long gone.

Third round day used to be one of the most eagerly-anticipated dates on the sporting calendar. But that just isn’t the case any more and it all depends on who you support.

If you’re a fan of a lower league team then the FA Cup is as important to your club as it ever was.

The chance is still there to take on some of the best sides in the land and also swell the club coffers along the way.

But if you follow a Premier League side, the FA Cup is a minor inconvenience and no amount of back-tracking by Aston Villa boss Paul Lambert should persuade otherwise.

When Lambert suggested top-flight clubs could do without the competition, he was merely stating what the majority of leading managers feel. He just shouldn’t have said it in public.

Compared to the financial rewards of staying in the Premier League, the £1.8million for winning the final is small fry. That would keep Wayne Rooney in wages for a few months.

As long as teams don’t want to be in the FA Cup, it can’t be restored to its former glory.

Comments (3)

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1:22pm Tue 7 Jan 14

grubberlog says...

I am glad Paul Lambert said what he said, and he most definitely should have said it publicly. If no one says anything, the FA will never see the problem. Years back the FA Cup was worth winning, for the money, the prestige, and for the added value of the Cup Winners Cup the following season. Nowadays the money no longer matters, there isn't as much prestige, and you also then get the pain of having to play in the Europa League the following season! Premier League clubs, from the top to the bottom, have much bigger stakes to play for over the season. The FA Cup is an inconvenience that they could all do without.
I am glad Paul Lambert said what he said, and he most definitely should have said it publicly. If no one says anything, the FA will never see the problem. Years back the FA Cup was worth winning, for the money, the prestige, and for the added value of the Cup Winners Cup the following season. Nowadays the money no longer matters, there isn't as much prestige, and you also then get the pain of having to play in the Europa League the following season! Premier League clubs, from the top to the bottom, have much bigger stakes to play for over the season. The FA Cup is an inconvenience that they could all do without. grubberlog
  • Score: 0

2:00pm Tue 7 Jan 14

Ex-St Johns says...

Perhaps give the fourth Champions League slot to the FA Cup Winners. Every now and again the Premier League's ECL co-efficient might be reduced if, say, Millwall win the FA Cup and then get hammered in Europe but overall the top teams would win the Cup because they would go full-on in every cup game. This would ensure there were larger crowds and more excitement. With the chance of getting into the Champions League via league placing reduced by 25%, teams would spend less on players because that investment would become more risky. This would mean that more English youngsters would get a chance to play in the Premier League. Following on from that the England team would improve and inevitably win the World Cup - thus increasing general well-being and productivity across the land. This is guaranteed to work!!!!!
Perhaps give the fourth Champions League slot to the FA Cup Winners. Every now and again the Premier League's ECL co-efficient might be reduced if, say, Millwall win the FA Cup and then get hammered in Europe but overall the top teams would win the Cup because they would go full-on in every cup game. This would ensure there were larger crowds and more excitement. With the chance of getting into the Champions League via league placing reduced by 25%, teams would spend less on players because that investment would become more risky. This would mean that more English youngsters would get a chance to play in the Premier League. Following on from that the England team would improve and inevitably win the World Cup - thus increasing general well-being and productivity across the land. This is guaranteed to work!!!!! Ex-St Johns
  • Score: 0

2:57pm Tue 7 Jan 14

Carthaginian says...

On one-hand, the FA Cup is a heavily-seeded tournament that by dint of their 3rd Round entry grants the Premier League and Championship the greatest chance of winning it, and rewards the four semi-finallists with over 50% of the total prize money the FA Cup has to offer.

On the other hand, the FA Cup is the primary means for distributing FA monies to grass-root football clubs, yet the early rounds are riven by regional imbalances, and the media pay annual over-the-top attention to the small handful of non-league Clubs that can get into higher profile rounds. The biases wouldn't matter so much, except that a good run in the FA Cup can exceed annual league gate revenues by several orders of magnitude, especially if a televised game is involved.

The future of the FA Cup may lie in a reform of the seeding, creating a greater interface between league and non-league. The restructuring can be relatively simple, and would involve Premier and Championship clubs playing just one more game. After all, that is what marks the competition out as distinctive.
On one-hand, the FA Cup is a heavily-seeded tournament that by dint of their 3rd Round entry grants the Premier League and Championship the greatest chance of winning it, and rewards the four semi-finallists with over 50% of the total prize money the FA Cup has to offer. On the other hand, the FA Cup is the primary means for distributing FA monies to grass-root football clubs, yet the early rounds are riven by regional imbalances, and the media pay annual over-the-top attention to the small handful of non-league Clubs that can get into higher profile rounds. The biases wouldn't matter so much, except that a good run in the FA Cup can exceed annual league gate revenues by several orders of magnitude, especially if a televised game is involved. The future of the FA Cup may lie in a reform of the seeding, creating a greater interface between league and non-league. The restructuring can be relatively simple, and would involve Premier and Championship clubs playing just one more game. After all, that is what marks the competition out as distinctive. Carthaginian
  • Score: 1

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