POLICE have warned people not to scan Cannabis QR code stickers which have been stuck on bins and lampposts around Worcester city centre. 

Shameless and audacious drug dealers have put the stickers up in various streets at the weekend, including not far from schools.

The distinctive black and gold stickers say “Get your delivery” and have a picture of a cannabis plant on them.

They have been spotted on bins and lampposts in roads including Farrier Street, Barbourne Road and St George's Square. 

Worcester News: DISTINCTIVE: Audacious drug dealers are sticking the distinctive stickers all over WorcesterDISTINCTIVE: Audacious drug dealers are sticking the distinctive stickers all over Worcester (Image: Newsquest)

The stickers include QR codes on them to be scanned - but police are warning people not to click on any links.

The digital codes are usually used by legitimate retailers to direct customers to online stores using a smartphone's camera to scan a black-and-white image which takes them directly to their page. 

Worcester News: STICKERS: The cannabis stickers that have gone up in Worcester city centreSTICKERS: The cannabis stickers that have gone up in Worcester city centre (Image: Newsquest)

However, savvy drug dealers are now using the technology to snare new customers with stickers placed near schools and the university buildings.

Fraudsters are also using fake QR codes in various scams.

Councillor Robyn Norfolk, who represents St John's, said: "It is shocking for them to go up near schools. 

"I have heard of QR codes being used to link to scams, but not drugs. 

Worcester News: DRUGS: Police are warning people not to click any links if they scan the QR codeDRUGS: Police are warning people not to click any links if they scan the QR code (Image: Newsquest)

"We have regular complaints about users smoking cannabis across the city. It is concerning - if they are seen in St John's they will be reported."

The Daily Mail has reported that the exact same image of a cannabis leaf has popped up on lampposts, bollards and other street furniture in South-East London. 

They say clicking through takes you to a glossy website featuring cannabis products with false claims of its products being legal.

The newspaper also says it invites people to follow them on the encrypted chat app Telegram, popular with criminals.

Worcester News:

The Worcester News has chosen to blur the QR codes in our pictures of the stickers.

A West Mercia Police spokesperson said it advises people not to scan the QR code, even if someone is curious about what the code is. 

Worcester News: COUNCILLOR: Councillor Robyn NorfolkCOUNCILLOR: Councillor Robyn Norfolk

The spokesperson added: "We are aware of the stickers being placed in some parts of Worcester.

"We are now investigating."

A spokesperson for Worcester City Council said: “We have reported this matter to the police who are investigating.

"Members of our street scene team are now out and about removing the stickers.”

The BBC recently reported QR code scammers have been targeting people using car parks putting them thousands of pounds out of pocket.